Category Archives: Songwriters

13 Albums That Changed My Life

(these albums are not necessarily my favorites or even the best albums by these bands, but they are albums that affected me so profoundly that I can actually remember thinking differently before and after I heard them. Listed roughly in the order they came to my attention)

the Beatles – Rubber Soul – I was 15 and had just moved and was at a church dance my parents made me go to with people I hated, and then somebody put Rubber Soul on the stereo and my life changed. I kept putting it on the stack even after somebody said: “Who’s the asshole that keeps putting that album on?” I bought it the next day and I was no longer alone. I like the British version better because it has more songs, but it doesn’t start with “I’ve Just Seen a Face”.

the Beatles –Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band –somebody told us that the Old Beatles were good and the new Beatles weren’t so we talked John Ranes into buying it first and then we went over to his house and listened to it from side one to side two every day for months. Mom said: “Coach is working you extra hard, you’re getting home so late.” We had never heard anything like it. 

Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol 1 – I was part of the “Dylan can write, but he can’t sing” school. Then one day I went to the Naval Academy to get my college physical and this album was in the hospital’s tiny BX for 99 cents. I couldn’t pass it up, and found out I loved just about everything about Dylan. I thought one way before listening to him, and another after.

the Rolling Stones –  High Tide and Green Grass – my friend Larry Prather sat behind me in Chemistry. When I told him I didn’t really like the Stones, he loaned me this to take home. I had bought my own copy by the time I gave it back.

The Byrds Greatest Hits – Still one of my favorite albums. Pure pop with Dylanish lyrics. Great songs, singing, guitars, lyrics, all made for the radio and my heart.

John Lennon – Plastic Ono Band – Unlike the others on this list, I’ve only played this album a few times. Its power is in the statement. Listened to it for the first time with Walt Konetzka, in my room at home and we both were blown away by the sheer honesty of the recording.

Van Morrison – Astral Weeks – I’ve loved this album since I first heard the great “Madame George” on WGTB in the early 70s. It doesn’t have his hits, doesn’t have anything resembling one on the album. What it does have is artistic beauty. Originally made to be a song cycle, his label changed the order, but it still has the feel of a song cycle.

Neil Young – Young Man’s Fancy (live bootleg but the recent release of Live at Massey Hall is similiar and almost as good and the sound is great) Lee Cadorette (Daktari to you Austin friends) bought the bootleg and it quickly became the most popular album in the house we were sharing. It’s between After the Goldrush (which we loved) and Harvest and contains the first time we heard most of Harvest’s songs, striking for their purity without a hint of the pop touches that were to come.

Elliott Murphy – Aquashow – I bought this and Springsteen’s Wild, Innocent the same day and they were both a revelation to me that I could write about what I know and the friends I knew. I had done that in short stories when I was in high school, but it never occurred to me to do it in song. I wrote By the Water that same day, an eight minute epic I wrote in about the time it takes to sing it.

Bruce Springsteen – Winterland (live bootleg) – Springsteen’s live shows then were so much more powerful than his albums themselves, and I like this one best, though Passaic Night is pretty great too. We used to have people over and play the entire concert, beginning to end. Sherry and I played this on the way home from our first Edge City show ever, at Wesley College in Delaware, and it sure sounded great driving home at night on empty roads in the dark. We used to play the version of Darkness on the Edge of Town from here before every show, just to remind us what was at stake.

Hank Williams – 24 Greatest Hits – when I bought this I wasn’t a country fan, much less a Hank one. I bought it because I knew he was a great writer and I wanted to study him. I would come home, put Hank on, and cook dinner for Sherry. One day I couldn’t find Hank, and I went crazy, going through all of my records, because I had to hear that album. That’s when I realized I wasn’t studying Hank anymore, I had fallen in love with his music. Once we were at a local club here and our friend Ken Schaffer introduced the next song as “the greatest song ever written”. I laughed out loud and said: “Pretty big claim, Ken.” He smiled and said: “It’s called ‘I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry.’” I said: “Oh well, then. Go ahead.”

John Coltrane – Afro Blue Impressions (especially My Favorite Things) – Damian Einstein, on WHFS, possibly the greatest station of all time, played something by the Dead that I liked, followed it with Coltrane, and followed that with the Byrds’ Eight Miles High. And I got jazz, or at least Coltrane, and bought the album the next day. I carried it around with me on tape all summer in case I needed to hear it. Coltrane led me to Miles Davis, pre Bitches Brew, which I never liked.

Leonard Cohen – Live in London – How to grow old gracefully (and powerfully). This is one of the newest records on this list. Cohen combines decades of great writing into one great sound. He didn’t used to be able to sing, now his voice is resonant with character.

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Top Played Songs, CDs, and Artists 2015

The Top 19 Most Played Songs on Jim & Sherry’s ITunes, IPods, Iphones, etc. 2015

12341574_10153295201073589_1453186312392572319_n1 End Of The World Jean Synodinos love & blood
2 These Things I’ve Come To Know James McMurtry Complicated Games
3 Wildflowers [Live] Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers The Live Anthology
4 Keep Me In Your Heart Christine Albert Everythings Beautiful Now
5 Picture Jean Synodinos love & blood
6 Among the Believers Darlene Love Introducing Darlene Love
7 You Got To Me James McMurtry Complicated Games
8 This Morning Jean Synodinos love & blood
9 The Damage Youve Done Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers Let Me Up Ive Had Enough
10 Real Renegade Jean Synodinos love & blood
11 Aint Got A Place James McMurtry Complicated Games
12 Runaway Trains Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers Let Me Up Ive Had Enough
13 Out Of My Mind Buffalo Springfield; Neil Young Buffalo Springfield Box Set [Disc 1]
14 A Wasted Life Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Long After Dark
15 How Many More Days Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Let Me Up I’ve Had Enough
16 The Starry Eyed The Belle Sounds The Belle Sounds
17 Stories We Can Tell Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Pack Up The Plantation: Live!
18 She Doesnt Love Him Anymore (demo) Jeff Talmadge 2015 6 Song Ideas
19 It’s Too Late To Live In Austin Grant Peeples & The Peeples Republik Punishing The Myth

Your questions premptively answered:

  1. Why 19 songs?  Fits on one CD.
  2. Are these the best songs of 2015? No, they’re the songs we listened to the most. Most aren’t even from 2015.
  3. How much music do you listen to during a year?  According to ITunes, over 6500 individual songs.
  4. I’m an artist on your list. How will this help me?  It will give you exposure to at least a dozen people.

It was a weird year listening to music for me. I liked a lot of new CDs, but only two got played consistently at our house and in our cars: Jean Synodinos’ Love and Blood and James McMurtry’s Complicated Games. 

Other things affected our listening: Lee (Daktari) Cadorette told me he thought the Buffalo Springfield Box Set was overrated, which led me to spend a lot of time with the Springfield, to see if he was right. (I played my edited 37 song version of the box set over and over and I felt no pain.)

I spent the first half the 2015 writing a novel, and I spent a lot of time listening to the music of the late 60s, early 70s, where much of the story takes place.

And there’s no special reason for Tom Petty to get so much play, except we must be Petty fans. I especially liked the Live Anthology, the disc of outtakes on the box set, and Let Me Up I’ve Had Enough, which I underrated when it came out.

Also Jean Synodinos’ album didn’t come out until September or she would have been higher up on the CD list.

Top 10 most played CDs

1 Buffalo Springfield Buffalo Springfield Box Set, vol 1
2 The Who Thirty Years of Maximum R&B, vol 1
3 James McMurtry Complicated Games
4 Buffalo Springfield Buffalo Springfield Box Set, vol 2
5 Tom Petty Live Anthology
6 The Long Ryders Best of the Long Ryders
7 Jean Synodinos Love & Blood
8 The Rascals The Ultimate Rascals
9 Tom Petty Playback, disc 6
10 Donovan Donovan’s Greatest Hits

Top Ten Most Played Artists

1 Tom Petty
2 Buffalo Springfield
3 The Who
4 Bob Dylan
5 The Rolling Stones
6 The Byrds
7 The Beatles
8 Bonnie Raitt
9 James McMurtry
10 The Long Ryders
top 25 included Jean Synodinos, Jeff Talmadge, and Jimmy LaFave

Neither of us realized we had played the Long Ryders as much as we did, but we’ve been Sid Griffin fans for a long time.

If you don’t know who the Belle Sounds are, check out last year’s post. The Starry Eyed is that rare song that makes our top list 2 years in a row. Great song, great band.

The Jeff Talmadge song is a co-write with Jim that we played over and over for friends. (One said: “That’s the saddest song ever written!”) Our version, with Sherry singing lead, is on our new, as yet unreleased CD.  You can pre-order The Hard Part of Flying here.

The picture of Jean Synodinos above was taken by Ron Baker at the fundraising/birthday party we had at NeWorlDeli to master our new CD, where 9 great songwriters joined us.

 

 

How Do You Listen to Music?

How do you listen to music these days?

I mostly listen to downloads or, if I have a CD, I rip it into my computer and listen on Itunes or through my IPod. The difference in the sound doesn’t bother me. I fell in love with music on a transistor radio and nothing can ever sound better than that music did to me.

When I get a CD by someone I’m eagerly anticipating (a James McMurtry or a Steve Earle) I usually play it all the way through. But even then, I’m already looking for the best songs to pull off and keep in my Itunes jukebox. When I purge, I’m often happy with an album that has three or four songs worth keeping.

I have two main databases for music: one, that I consider my jukebox, has my three thousand favorite songs plus a few hundred to decide about. The other is more eclectic, has between 10 and 14 thousand songs, depending on when I purged Itunes last.

It’s a singles world for me, only it’s singles of my own choosing.

So why don’t I listen to more albums all the way through? Well, first, I grew up in an album world where one side of a record was 20 minutes or less. More than that seems long to me, and I’m ready to move on to something else. Second, most albums don’t have great songs all the way through. I’ve digitalized many if not most of my thousands of records, and it’s great to eliminate that song I never liked anyway.

The great thing about the modern world is that anyone can make CDs, no longer tied to the whims of large corporations. The bad thing is that anyone can make CDs, and there are a lot of bad ones out there. If I’m not already familiar with what I’m listening to, I’ll admit I’ve gotten to where I listen to pieces of the first 3 or 4 songs and if they don’t grab me, that’s it. CDs by friends go into a box in my garage because I know I may not have given them a fair chance and I’m more than willing to have my mind changed. Others that don’t grab me go to Goodwill.

I learn about new CDs from friends: Jeff Talmadge came over one day last year, handed me The Belle Sounds new album and said: “Put this on”, and it became my favorite album of the year. I learn from the radio (though less and less these days): mostly Sun Radio from Dripping Springs and Tom Petty’s show on SiriusXM, which sounds to me like an alternate Jim Patton, spinning discs and saying things like: “But have you heard the B side?” And I learn from hearing great songs by songwriters who inhabit the same world we do. It just takes one great song for me to be interested.

I don’t give songs more of a chance because 1) I already have a great collection and it’s tough to break into; and 2) because I’m a songwriter, I don’t want to listen to mediocre material. Garbage in; garbage out.

So two ways I listen are through shuffle play, either my ‘jukebox’ or the larger database. I also form miscellaneous playlists with whatever is new I’m hearing and want to hear again. For years I made miscellaneous tapes for my friends. This is like having a collection of them, eliminating the songs I didn’t like anymore. I also listen to short, 6-8 song versions of new CDs. And I make playlists for all my favorites, my own personal ‘best ofs”. Two years ago I listened to a David Broyles song where he claims all the best Kinks albums were the first ones, so I had to listen again (and again) to see if he was right. Three years ago I decided to study the underrated works of Paul Edward Sanchez, so that’s all I listened to for weeks. Last year, Lee Cadorette said he thought the Buffalo Springfield was overrated, so I listened to them a lot to see if that’s true. Or sometimes, like with The Belle Sounds or K.C. Clifford, I just fall in love with the music and that’s all I play.

I doubt that anyone listens to music the way I do. But because I listen so differently than say, even 15 years ago, I’m curious as to how you listen. Especially since we’re in the process of making our next CD. Do you take the time to stick with a new album all the way through? Do the first few songs make the difference? When we sequence a CD, I always think back to how I would sequence a record. That’s what I was raised on. I made my first homemade tape almost 45 years ago, and there was a side one, and a side two, and I’ve been making them ever since. I remember a lot of records that I didn’t discover the greatness of side two for months. Now I have to ask: do you even get to the songs that are on what would have been ‘side two’? We know that the sequencing still needs a flow, even while we try to make sure our best stuff is up front. And then of course: what’s the best stuff? How do we know?

How about the length of CDs? I like a 30-40 minute album, straight to the point. But CDs can hold as much as 80 min. Do you feel cheated?

And, just out of curiosity, who are you listening to these days? You can find most of what I listen to by checking out our top Itunes lists each year since the beginning of this blog. I’d like to know who you listen to and how you found them.

Your thoughts, please.

 

 

Songwriter=Storyteller

Recently at a show on the road, an old friend came up to tell me he was sorry about my brother. I didn’t know what he was talking about until he said: “You know, the drugs, ‘Son of My Father’,” which is a song of mine in which “my” brother ends up in the housing projects because of his addiction to drugs. Never happened; not to my brother. In that same song, “my” father goes to jail, something else that never happened.

I once sent my mom a clipping from Bar Harbor ME, thinking she’d be pleased to see us getting articles that far away. But the article ended by saying that the songs, especially “Son of My Father”, were clearly drawn from my own life. After that Mom wanted to follow me around the country, jumping up each time I played that song, shouting: “His father did not go to jail! His brother is not a junkie!”

Once we opened with “Son of My Father” here in Austin and afterwards one of my favorite songwriters said to me: “Is that first song about you? Because it would explain so much.” It might, if it was about me. It’s someone’s story, but not mine.

That doesn’t mean I’m not in it somewhere. Who, growing up, hasn’t sworn they’d never be like their parents? And the bridge, where the character asks what’s the difference between him and his addicted family, well I’m in there too, I guess, though talking to my friends, not my family.

But the point is that even in my most personal songs, everything is a story. I don’t think you can get much more personal than “Ballad of the Oxbow Inn” but even in that mostly true story, I take liberties with events, combine characters, and put in some things that just never happened because they make a better story. A song like “Another Pretty Deep Hole” combines several friends and events into one character.

I’m cautious about explaining too much here because it’s like a magician showing his tricks. In the best songs you do believe the singer and I don’t want to take that away from any of our audience. And it’s what the song means to you as a listener that matters.

Jeff Talmadge and I have a new song that illustrates one way we write and one way we push a song into new dimensions. It’s called “My Hometown’s Not My Hometown Anymore”, and it combines our different hometown experiences into one. Jeff’s small town is literally gone. He showed me pictures of closed and shuttered doors and windows, and tumbleweeds blowing down Main Street. My town, which I usually refer to as Swan Point in my songs, was a small town when I moved there that has been overrun by the suburbs, to where you can’t tell the difference between the suburban landscapes as you drive down Ritchie Highway.

But the experience the character has going back is neither of ours. In one line I sing: “No one knows my name” which is nowhere close to the truth for us. We’ve been playing to sold out crowds in Annapolis (Harbortowne in my songs) mostly to people who went to the same high school around the same time I did and it’s been wonderful.  We love them all. When I sing “Everybody here has gotten out or gotten old” , it doesn’t apply to my life at all. But the song is more complicated than that. The place names are from “Swan Point”, but those places have been gone 40 years. The character feels to me like he’s in 1994 or so (the year we moved from Maryland), bemoaning the loss of a world he professed not to care about anyway, wondering if the kids he’s watching will figure it out earlier than he did. And that’s how you get to something new, or one way, anyway.

There are other dangers in taking what songwriters say too literally. I write from memory a lot; those experiences will never die inside me. When I was 22, my closest friend was killed in a car wreck and my first love broke up with me, all within a few months. I don’t need to have more tragedy to write about tragedy. I know what it feels like to be brokenhearted and lonely. In the paraphrased words of Chuck Berry, “I may be old, man, but I can remember!”

And as a songwriter I feel no compunction to be fair. I see each incident as a circle that I move around, writing songs from a different angle, moving on to the next one. Maybe I’ll get to ‘fair’ in the next song, but my latest is called “My Heart’s Turned To Stone” and I didn’t worry about being fair at all.

Top 10 most played CDs on Jim & Sherry’s ITunes/IPhones/IPods 2014

1 The Belle Sounds The Belle Sounds
2 Gene Clark Here Tonight: The White Light Demos
3 Bob Dylan Basement Tapes Sampler
4 John Fullbright Songs
5 The Byrds The Byrds [BOX SET] [Disc 1]
6 Buffalo Springfield Buffalo Springfield Box Set
7 Garland Jeffreys Wild In The Streets (Best Of 1977-1983)
8 Jimmy LaFave Trail 2
9 Paul Kelly Spring and Fall
10 Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Playback

The Belle Sounds new CD plus their newer EP dominated our listening through 2014: gorgeous, shimmering pop music. Gene Clark’s CD was released a couple of years ago, I think, and is a collection of demos for his great White Light album from the early 70s. John Fullbright is hard to categorize, except as great young songwriter. The Garland Jeffreys CD was gifted to us by Eddie Walker, who wrote “Ordinary Life” on our The Great Unknown CD. Jimmy Lafave’s Trail CDs are his version of the Bootleg Series.

 

The Belle Sounds
The Belle Sounds

Top 20 Most Played Songs on Jim and Sherry’s ITunes, IPods, IPhones, etc. 2014

1 The Starry Eyed The Belle Sounds
2 Rockingham Lane The Belle Sounds
3 Until You Were Gone John Fullbright
4 Company of Friends Carrie Elkin & Danny Schmidt
5 Never Cry Again John Fullbright
6 When We Were Young The Belle Sounds
7 100 Different Ways of Being Alone BettySoo
8 Early Days Paul McCartney
9 Just In Case K.C. Clifford
10 Get In Line Ron Sexsmith
11 Sleeping Dogs C. Daniel Boling
12 Little Aches and Pains Paul Kelly
13 Not Dark Yet Jimmy LaFave
14 White Light Gene Clark
15 Im On Your Side Paul Kelly
16 Highway to Hell Bruce Springsteen
17 Pacing the Cage Bruce Cockburn
18 If I Was a River Willie Nile
19 Sweet Marie Hangdog
20 Odds and Ends alt take 1 Bob Dylan & The Band

Your questions preemptively answered:

1. Why 20 songs?  Fits on one CD.

2. Are these the best 20 songs of 2014? Some of them aren’t even from 2014.  No, these are the 20 songs we played the most, which means they’re mostly our favorites. But “Sleeping Dogs” was on this list in 2012, though with a live version, and “Just in Case” is a repeat from 2012 just because we like it a lot, especially in this year we lost so many Austin friends. “Get in Line” is on for the second year in a row.

3. Where’s Christine Albert’s fine new album?  Didn’t get it until too late in the year to make an impact on this year’s rankings. Look for 2015.

4. How much music do you listen to in a year?  This year, over 7,000 individual songs. We listen less to CDs these days than IPod/ITunes where we dump everything and then edit out what we don’t like or want to hear anymore.

If you don’t have any of these incredible songs or CDs, we’ll be glad to point you in the right direction. Obviously we can listen them over and over.

*one caveat: We don’t count CDs played (because there’s no easy way to do it) and we don’t listen to CDs themselves that much anyway). But if we had, Bettysoo’s Little Tiny Secrets, from several albums ago would have been at the top, all of the songs, because for about six months that’s all Sherry listened to in her car.

Top 10 CDs on Jim & Sherry’s IMachines 2013

1 Willie Nile  – American Ride he’s been making great music since the 80s, and this pledgemusic funded one finds him at the top of his game

2 The Kinks –  Kinda Kinks In one of my favorite songs from last year, Dr. Pants’ “The Cassette Song”, David Broyles claims the first five Kinks albums are their best, and as a fan of singer-songwriter  Ray Davies, and someone who only owned a “best of ” their early days, I had to check it out. Played a lot of Kinks this year.

3 Jon Emery Sings the Songs of Gene Clark– Gene Clark is one of my favorite singers and songwriters, and Jon Emery does him complete justice on this beautiful album.

4 Kacey Musgraves –  Same Trailer Different ParkYes, she’s popular in the Country world, but her songs are among the best. Texas woman from just up the road from us.

5 Craig Marshall –  Hiding In The Doorway former popmeister Marshall makes a move toward singer-songwriter with terrific, well defined results. He’s still Pop, his country is like Elvis Costello singing country, but he’s found a sound that suits him well. 

6 Ron Sexsmith –  Long Player Late Bloomer underrated pop songwriter with a couple songs on this CD that continually break my heart. Lovely music.

7 John Fogerty – Wrote a Song for Everyone– I didn’t really expect to like this album. Those songs are so ingrained in my head and heart that I wasn’t sure I needed to hear duets of them 40 years later. But Fogerty hasn’t sounded so alive in years, at least five or six of the songs are redefined and reenergized, Miranda Lambert does the best “Wrote A Song For Everyone” ever, Fogerty has two new songs that are also his best in years, and nobody seems to have phoned anything in. And the songs are as great as ever.

8 Grateful Dead – Live Rarities– Most of what I like on here is a lot from 71-73, my favorite Dead period. Also released was Europe ’72, part two, including a beautiful “Looks Like Rain”.

9 The Byrds – The Byrds [BOX SET] [Disc 1] – I have no idea how this CD got this much play, except that I still love the Byrds and play them a lot. More than I thought, apparently.

10 Ian Hunter – When I’m President – 70+ year old Ian Hunter continues to make great, rocking albums

Almost in the top 10 and worth mentioning:

Chris Wall – El Western Motel,  Willie Nelson – Country Music,  Amanda Shires – Down Fell the Doves,  Jason Isbell – Southeastern

Top 21 Most Played Songs on Jim & Sherry’s ITunes, IPods, IPhones, etc 2013

1 When I’m President Ian Hunter When I’m President
2 Follow Your Arrow Kacey Musgraves Same Trailer Different Park
3 This is Our Time Willie Nile American Ride
4 Get In Line Ron Sexsmith Long Player Late Bloomer
5 Faith and Gasoline Hilary Claire Adamson
6 Silver Lining Kacey Musgraves Same Trailer Different Park
7 Tried So Hard Jon Emery Sings the Songs of Gene Clark
8 Long Emotional Ride Graham Parker Three Chords Good
9 Late Bloomer Ron Sexsmith Long Player Late Bloomer
10 Wasted and Rollin Amanda Shires Down Fell the Doves
11 One Guitar V2.0 Willie Nile American Ride
12 Changing Heart Jon Emery Sings the Songs of Gene Clark
13 Paint It, Black The Coal Porters Find The One
14 Wrote a Song For Everyone John Fogerty; Miranda Lambert Wrote a Song for Everyone
15 As The Story Goes Craig Marshall Hiding In The Doorway
16 A Long Way From Home The Kinks Lola vs Powerman
17 Its Gonna Be Alright Gerry and the Pacemakers
18 Tell Me What’s Wrong Ron Flynt Tell Me What’s Wrong – Single
19 Hold On The Biters All Chewed Up
20 Poor Man John Wort Hannam Toronto Bound
21 Company of Friends Danny Schmidt Little Grey Sheep

Your questions preemptively answered:

1. Why 21 songs? Fits on one CD

2. Gerry and the Pacemakers? I’ll bet you didn’t know they could rock this hard. Or maybe even rock. We sure didn’t.

3. Since you use shuffle play so much, why does this list matter? These are the songs that we went to again and again, maybe to play for each other, maybe to play for friends, maybe to put in our current “top 40 or so” playlist to listen. The list of bands played reflects our shuffle listening, but the songs and albums almost always reflect what’s new (to us).

4. Who are the Biters?  We have no idea. Found both them and the Gerry & the Pacemaker’s tune through Tom Petty’s radio show on satellite radio.

5. Why is that great Ron Flynt single at the bottom of the charts? Give us a break, it didn’t come out until November.

6. Isn’t Kacey  Musgraves, like, popular? Yes, she is, giving hope to popular song. Here at WJIM (or WSBP, depending on the time of day), we don’t play a song because it’s popular or not popular (how would we even know?) but because we think it’s a good song.

 

Third Coast Songwriter Showcase at Folk Alliance lineup

Friday   10:30
Patterson Barrett
The Flyin A’s
Owen Temple

11:30
Melissa Greener
Joel Rafael
Jeff Talmadge

12:30
Wyatt Easterling
Rebecca Loebe
Jim Patton & Sherry Brokus

Saturday Afternoon
2:00
Kevin Elliott
Butch Morgan
Grant Peeples

3:00
Bronwynne Brent
Megan Burtt
Beth Wood

Saturday Night Shows
10:30
Mary Battiata
John Lilly
Amanda Pearcy

11:30
Michael Fracasso
Dan Navarro
Jim Patton & Sherry Brokus

12:30
Rj Cowdery
Wyatt Easterling

1:30
Berkalin Recored Artists
Matt Harlan
Brian Kalinec
Jim Patton & Sherry Brokus
Libby Koch
(Jeff Talmadge)

Our schedule
Thursday 11 Soona Songs RM 704
Thursday 11:50 Anderson Fair RM 647